NY*Confidential: End of the Tracks Edition

The map of New York City’s subway may be getting a makeover. Six new map designs have popped up inside the 86th Street station in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Currently works in progress, the MTA wants riders to help them design a new map.

Dear NY*Confidants,

Greetings from a much-needed break from New York. Over that break, I decided I needed to reorient some of my priorities. Unless there is great outcry for this newsletter, I am putting it on indefinite hold. This is the last issue… the end of the tracks, the road, the Greenway…

On a personal note, I want to thank all my readers and cheerleaders of the past four or five years, who have truly appreciated my efforts. I came up with NY*Confidential because I wanted to enjoy my life and this city when I stopped drinking in 2012, and not spend any of my free time in AA meetings, or anything close to them. I wanted my friends and family to come to events with me and possibly get excited about the Magritte exhibit at MoMA or the Belle & Sebastian concert at Forest Hills (the best place to see outdoor concerts, hands down) or the New York Empire World Team Tennis (and Mets games). And to that extent, I think I have been successful. This newsletter has pushed me to really participate in New York.

That said, putting it together even every other week just takes up too much time. The idea behind this little publication — to offer my creative friends a resource for their “stuff” — never materialized, either. The competition (New Yorker, TimeOut, New York Times whatever) is steep. I am likely moving to London in the late fall. And well, I guess I need to find a “real” job — one that pays something. Believe me, I have applied for grants, funds, anything to keep this kind of journalism alive, but the money isn’t coming… at all.

I truly love being a journalist. It’s the best job going. Just about every day is a new adventure, a new something to see, a new person to meet, a new story to tell. This will come off as schmaltzy, but I believe journalism is not a job. It’s a calling, a public service. Done right, it changes hearts and minds, fosters action or forgiveness, provides hope and alerts citizens to the angelic or demonic in our world. The problem is, I just can’t find a sustainable way to practice it. And this hurts me at the core of my being.

But this is our collective situation. And to be honest, Unsubscribing from the dozens of weekly emails from almost every cultural institution in the city will help my inbox anxiety ;-) On that note, I just want to tell you all that I hope you enjoyed and benefitted from my endeavor. I know that some of you might have been added unwillingly, but to be honest, I wouldn’t have added you if I didn’t think you would have enjoyed. And also, the name of the game is subscribers — the higher the number, the more of a chance that you have a viable publication that sticks around.

If anything changes, you’ll be the first to know. In the meantime, keep an eye on www.nyconfidant.com, which will have information through August and on regular events. Also, I recommend Untapped Cities for great cultural news and excursions.

-Adrian Brune, founder, editor-in-chief, inbox-motivator, journalist/NY*Confidential

Miss your commute? See what you missed by not living in the era of Penn Station, which was ‘not the Parthenon, but it might as well be’.

BOOK READINGS, TOURS + PERFORMANCE

IRL ‘UNTAPPED CITY’ TOURS RETURN!

History of Jazz in NYC’ Webinar & 78rpm Listening Party: From Harlem's mob-run night clubs in the 1920s, to the narrow basement joints lining 52nd Street, New York would eventually become the undisputed Jazz Capital of America. 6 August, 8pm, $10.

Greenlight Bookstore Presents Akwaeke Emezi, The Death of Vivek Oji: One day, in a town in southeastern Nigeria, a mother opens her front door to discover her son’s body at her feet. What follows is the tumultuous story of one family’s struggle to understand a child whose spirit is both gentle and mysterious. 6 August, 7:30pm.

NYPL Presents PEN America President Suzanne Nossel, Dare to Speak: Nossel’s new book, Dare to Speak: Defending Free Speech for All, is a guide to maintaining democratic debate that is open and free-wheeling but at the same time respectful of a rich diversity of backgrounds. 6 August, 8pm.

Scandalous Tales from Early 20th-Century Upper West Side: By the late Victorian era, the Upper West Side and Harlem had become home to a coterie of well-to-do and wealthy families. But not all were upstanding members of their community. Explore the tales of the neighborhoods’ most mischievous characters. 10 August, 8pm, $10.

NYPL Presents Edward Ball, Life of a Klansman: Ball returns to the subject of his first book, Slaves in the Family. This time, he tells the story of a warrior in the Ku Klux Klan, a carpenter in Louisiana who took up the cause after the Civil War: his his great-great-grandfather Polycarp Constant Lecorgne. 11 August, 8pm.

Strand Presents Isabel Wilkerson, Caste: The Origins of our Discontents: The Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows it defines our lives. 11 August, 7pm, $37, includes copy of book.

Open Society Foundations Presents Eric Alterman, Lying in State: If there’s one thing we know about Donald Trump, it’s that he lies. But he’s by no means the first president to do so. Alterman shows that, from early on, the United States has persistently expanded its power and hegemony on presidential lies. 11 August, 6pm.

Pennsylvania Station: The Most Beautiful Train Station Ever Built’ Webinar: From its soaring 150-foot ceilings inspired by the Roman Baths of Caracalla to its imperial colonnade entrances, Penn Station was a righteous portal into America's largest city — the story of one of the grandest public spaces ever built and its untimely demise. 12 August, 8pm, $10.

Strand Presents Sara Schaefer, Grand: Comedian Sara Schaefer’s hilariously honest memoir follows the trip through the Grand Canyon with her sister that causes her to reflect on childhood and the scandal that changed her family forever. 12 August, 7pm.

Strand Presents Heather Cabot, The New Chardonnay: The Unlikely Story of How Marijuana Went Mainstream: Cabot’s book explores the confluence of social, economic, and political forces that brought marijuana into the mainstream. Among them, the booming self-care industry, stressed-out professionals and seniors clamoring pain remedies. 13 August, 7pm.

Controversial Public Art in NYC’ Webinar: From sculptures installed against public opinion to statues of outdated role models, explore the past, present, and future of the city’s most controversial art pieces. 13 August, 1pm, $10.

The Ultimate Virtual Wine Crash Course with Sommelier Amy Karasavas: Some people spend their lives trying to understand everything about wine; one NYC-based sommelier has a crash course on the basics: 13 August, 8pm, $10.

Old New York Told Through Antique 16mm Projector Short Films: Nearly 100 years before Netflix the talk of the town was 16mm technology. See how that tech facilitated a film revolution, with never-before-seen reels of NYC. 14 August, 8pm, $10.

The Long Island Estates that Inspired The Great Gatsby’ Webinar: A digital exploration of the magnificent estates of Long Island’s ‘Gold Coast’ , believed to have inspired the classic 1925 F. Scott Fitzgerald novel. 17 August, 1pm, $10.

Greenlight Books Presents Betsy Bonner, The Book of Atlantis Black: A young woman is found dead on the floor of a Tijuana hotel room. An ID in a nearby purse reads ‘Atlantis Black.’ So begins Betsy Bonner’s search for her sister, Atlantis, and the final months before her disappearance. 17 August, 7:30pm, $10.

The Secrets of Grand Central Terminal’ Webinar: Grand Central has captivated people from around the world with its architectural beauty, but it’s also full of secrets — from being the target of a failed Nazi sabotage mission to hidden areas that keep train traffic running each day. 17 August, 8pm, $10.

Edith Wharton’s New York: NYC’s Gilded Age Elite Society’ Webinar: Celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence, with a glimpse into Wharton’s life and New York Gilded Age. 18 August, 5:30pm. $10.

Strand Presents Fatima Bhutto, The Runaways: Anita lives in Karachi’s biggest slum and wants out. On the other side of Karachi lives Monty, whose father owns half the city and expects great things of him. Sunny doesn’t fit in anywhere. These three lives will cross in the desert, where their secrets will force them to make a choice. 18 August, 6pm. $25, includes book.

Underground Manhattan, The History of the NYC Subway System: Explore the oldest subway stations in New York City (virtually) working up from Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall station to Grand Central Terminal. Includes the art, architecture, and secrets hiding in plain sight. 18 August, 8pm. $10.

MTA Arts & Design: NYC’s Great Underground Art Museum’ Webinar: The New York subway contains a first-rate art museum comprised of works created in mosaic, terra cotta and mixed-media. Get up close and personal. 19 August, 5:30pm, $10.

Forming the Metropolis: NYC’s Rise Told Through Art’ Webinar: Embark on an art-centric journey through 19th-century New York City, and see how the period between 1800 and the Civil War would lay the foundation to form the metropolis. 20 August, 5:30pm. $10.

NYPL August Book Club: All Adults Here by Emma Straub: Have a library card? Download a copy of the book on the free e-reader SimplyE. Then, look out for librarian-led discussion groups and special livestream events. 31 August, 7pm.

After spending six years living abroad Serena Stevens returned to Fort Madison, Iowa, to paint the distance between past and present. See Iowa Dream at Postmasters Gallery.

CANVAS

Serena Stevens, Iowa Dream: Stevens paints intimate spaces and nondescript objects of everyday life, vacillating between experience and memory, surface and subject. The familiar and overlooked trace the contours of a private world. Postmasters, 174 Franklin St., thru 12 Sept. By appt.

The Book of Ruth, Medieval to Modern: Famine and flight, emigration and immigration, foreignness: these are some of the societal issues touched upon by the anonymous author of the Bible’s Book of Ruth. See the 18-foot-long, accordion-fold vellum manuscript, designed and illuminated by artist Barbara Wolff. Morgan Library.

Alexis Rockman, Lost at Sea: Rockman has blended sites of civilization and nature to deliver a prescient and occasionally apocalyptic vision of the ecological state of the planet. Sperone Westwater Gallery.

Monuments Now: The eye-catching ziggurat Because Once You Enter My House, It Becomes Our House, by Jeffrey Gibson — of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians — introduces work by a trio of indigenous American artists that questions the nature of monuments. Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City.

Armageddon: In Hollywood, doomsday = an asteroid-dimpled White House, a decapitated Lady Liberty. Three artists — Oliver Laric, Louise Lawler, and Sara VanDerBeek — deconstruct this instinct through the Greek and Roman icons that inspired American art. Metro Pictures.

Edward Hopper, Fondation Beyeler: Focuses on Hopper’s iconic representations of the infinite expanse of American landscapes and cityscapes that have rarely been highlighted in exhibitions. Thru 20 Sept.

Cutting through the political noise, The Line reveals the lived experiences of frontline workers and their battle to save lives in a system built to serve the bottom line.

THEATRE + DANCE

The Line: Crafted from interviews with medical first responders during the COVID-19 pandemic, the play reveals the lived experiences of frontline workers and their battle to save lives in a system built to serve the bottom line. Thru 1 Sept.

Finish the Fight: They were tireless organizers. Tenacious fighters. And political geniuses. They were indigenous and immigrant. Together they won women the right to vote. A virtual play celebrating the unsung heroes of suffrage. 18 August.

Broadbend, Arkansas: Benny, an orderly at a nursing home, delicately balances his role as a caregiver to an ornery white resident in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement. Thirty years later, his daughter, Ruby, struggles to understand an incident of police brutality against her 15-year-old son. Thru 16 August.

And So We Come Forth: Richard Nelson has been writing about the Apple family of Rhinebeck, New York, for 10 years — mostly for The Public Theatre. This year, the cycle’s siblings — and the actors portraying them — interact on Zoom, like everyone else. Thru 26 August.

Mostly Mozart Festival: This year, the Lincoln Center’s festival will be on the radio, but kicks off with musicians performing short pop-up concerts featuring at outdoor locations across New York City. 10 August.

JoyceStream Presents A.I.M, Meditation: A Silent Prayer: The ten-minute work, cuts through mournful strings and the audio from Philando Castile’s death, with the voice of Carrie Mae Weems listing the names and ages of Black people killed by the police. Artwork by Titus Kaphar highlights the dancers’ prayer. Thru 14 August.

Covid-19? Daryl Hall and John Oates can handle it. But not The Man Eater. See them at Jones Beach.

UPCOMING SCREEN CONCERTS

Cayucas: 11 August, 3pm

Emel Mathlouthi: 11 August, 6pm

UPCOMING IRL CONCERTS

Ticketmaster, BoweryPresents, LiveNation

Hall and Oates: 25 Aug., Jones Beach

Morrissey: 17 Sept.,Hammerstein Ballroom

Josh Ritter: 22-23 Sept., Murmrr

The Revivalists: 30 Sept., Radio City Music Hall

Thom Yorke: 2 Oct., Radio City Music Hall

The Dandy Warhols: 12 Nov., Music Hall of Williamsburg

Flannery is an intimate exploration of the life and work of author Flannery O’Connor, a devoted Catholic, bird lover and Southern observer whose distinctive style influenced a generation of artists.

CINEMA (STREAMING)

Film Forum Virtual: Watch some of the best films of the year from home and support Film at Lincoln Center. Select new releases:

  • Flannery: Lyrical, intimate exploration of the life and work of author Flannery O’Connor. Includes conversations with those who knew her, never-before-seen archival footage and newly discovered personal letters.

  • Helmut Newton, the Bad and the Beautiful: Newton made a name for himself by creating stylized, dreamlike fashion photography that was disturbing, ambiguous and bold. Critics questioned whether the women in his photos were treated as icons or erotic objects — or both.

  • John Lewis, Good Trouble: Using interviews and rare archival footage, Good Trouble chronicles Lewis’ 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health-care reform and immigration.

Films at Lincoln Center Virtual Cinema: Watch some of the best films of the year from home and support Film at Lincoln Center. Select new releases:

  • Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets: On the eve of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, a Las Vegas dive bar becomes a stage where employees and barflies commiserate one last time.

  • First Cow: A taciturn loner and skilled cook finds true connection with a Chinese immigrant. They collaborate on a successful business, reliant upon the clandestine participation of a nearby landowner's prized milking cow. 

  • Ghost Tropic: After work, a Maghrebi cleaning woman falls asleep on the last subway train and wakes up at the end of the line. She has no choice but to make her way across Brussels on foot. Opens 28 August.

Decade of Fire: Left unprotected by the city government, nearly 250,00 people in the Bronx were displaced as their close-knit, multiethnic neighborhood burned to the ground in the 1970s. See this an untold piece of American urban history. PBS.

Seberg: Inspired by true events about the French New Wave darling, Jean Seberg (Kristen Stewart), was targeted by the FBI because of her support of the civil rights movement and romantic involvement with Hakim Jamal. Amazon Prime.

Ida B. Wells, A Passion for Justice: Wells was a household name in Black America during much of her lifetime (1863-1931) and was considered the equal of her well-known African American contemporaries. Joins excerpts from Wells’s memoirs (read by Toni Morrison) and interviews with scholars with teeming visuals. Kanopy.

The Tobacconist: 17-year-old Franz moves to Vienna to apprentice at a tobacco shop. There he meets Sigmund Freud, a regular customer. When he falls desperately in love with Anezka, he seeks advice from the renowned psychoanalyst, who admits that the female sex is as big a mystery to him, too. Symphony Space Thalia Film.

You Never Had It, An Evening with Charles Bukowski: A long night of smoking cigarettes and drinking wine with Bukowski and his soon to be wife, Linda Lee Beighle, talking about all kinds of subjects Symphony Space Thalia Film.

Becoming the Song: Profiles the openly gay Hong Kong singer and human rights activist Denise Ho and explores her remarkable journey from commercial Cantopop superstar to outspoken political activist. Symphony Space Thalia Film.

Want to watch some fly b-ball? Check out the New York Liberty on ESPN2 and other networks through August. See also the new threads, repped by Kia Nurse and Sabrina Ionescu.

SPORT

New York Mets:

v. Florida Marlins, 7-8 August, 7pm; 9 August, 1pm

v. Washington Nationals: 10-12 August, 7pm; 13 August, 1pm

v. New York Yankees: 21-22 August, 7pm; 23 August, 1pm

v. Florida Marlins: 25-27 August, 7pm

See Ticket policies.

WNBA New York Liberty (all games played in Bradenton, Florida; broadcast on CBS Sports Network, YES):

v. Washington Mystics, 7 August, 7pm

v. Las Vegas Aces: 9 August, 3pm

v. Los Angeles Sparks: 11 August, 6pm

v. Indiana Fever: 13 August, 6pm

v. Minnesota Lynx: 15 August, 6pm

v. Seattle Storm: 18 August, 9pm

v. Chicago Sky: 20 August, 7pm

v. Connecticut Sun: 22 August, 7pm

v. Chicago Sky: 25 August, 7pm

v. Dallas Wings: 27 August, 8pm

v. Las Vegas Aces: 29 August, 4pm

Former champs Andy Murray, Kim Clijsters headline 2020 US Open singles wild cards.

2020 US Open: Past US Open champions Kim Clijsters and Andy Murray received wild-card invitations for the Grand Slam to be held in a tennis “bubble” sans spectators. Other players include:

Women: Simona Halep, of Romania, a two-time Grand Slam champion; No. 3 Karolina Pliskova, of the Czech Republic; No. 4 Sofia Kenin, of the United States, the 2020 Australian Open champion; No. 5 Elina Svitolina, of Ukraine; No. 6 Bianca Andreescu, of Canada, the defending US Open women’s singles champion; and No. 9 Serena Williams, of the United States, a six-time US Open and 23-time Grand Slam champion.

Men: Novak Djokovic, a three-time US Open champion; No. 3 Dominic Thiem, of Austria; No. 5 Daniil Medvedev, of Russia, a 2019 US Open finalist; No. 6 Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece; No. 7 Alexander Zverev, of Germany; No. 8 Matteo Berrettini, of Italy; and No. 10 David Goffin, of Belgium.

31 August to Sept. 13 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y.

NY*Confidential What's On

The Governor's Island/Vacation Edition

Greetings, NY*Confidants!

First up, Governors Island, one of New York City’s favorite summertime spots, reopens on 15 July (!) from 10am to 7pm every day (!!). Only one hitch: advance tickets must be purchased for the ferries to allow for social distancing on the island. That said, Governors Island will open The Hills, Hammock Grove and the Urban Farm, as well as 2019 art installations including Shantell Martin’s The May Room inside the military chapel and Rachel Whiteread’s Cabin, a permanent installation. Citi Bike and Blazing Saddles are offering bike rentals, pedal cars, surreys and scooters. No glamping, though. If you are not wanting to venture out quite yet, MoMA has put together some art-making activities for you and yours.

Also, some of the shows we missed this Spring have been rescheduled (still subject to Covid-phasing). Right now, these are the ones we can safely go with. Check out Bowery Presents for the latest: Morrissey, 17 Sept., Hammerstein Ballroom; The Revivalists: 30 Sept., Radio City Music Hall; Thom Yorke: 2 Oct., Radio City Music Hall; and The Dandy Warhols: 12 Nov., Music Hall of Williamsburg.

Your friendly entertainment guru is off to Oklahoma on a story and a family visit for the rest of July. Enjoy and see you then!

Portions of What’s On: NY*Confidential reside on www.nyconfidant.com and Facebook

Pass it on and support the artistic community. We do it for love, but must survive.

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Jost writes with razor-sharp comic timing about everything from his youth in Staten Island to Harvard to behind the scenes at SNL. He appears at Murmrr Lit Presents Colin Jost, A Very Punchable Face with Michael Che on 13 July.

BOOK READINGS, TOURS + PERFORMANCE

UNLESS STATED, EVENTS ARE FREE; TIMES ARE EDT

Modern Fashion 101 + How to Dress Confidently’: Being fashionable isn't about wearing a three-piece suit or designer dress; it’s about getting a curated style. One fashion industry vet reveals the craft of developing that look. 9 July, 1pm, $10.

Community Bookstore Presents Andrew Martin, Cool for America: A humorous collection of overlapping stories that explores the dark zone between artistic ambition and its achievements, bookended by the misadventures of Leslie, a young woman, who moves from New York to Missoula, Montana to beat lingering depression. 9 July, 7:30pm.

Powerhouse Presents Diane Cardwell, Rockaway: Unmoored by a failed marriage and disconnected from her high-octane life in the city, Diane Cardwell finds herself staring at a small group of surfers coasting through mellow waves toward shore. She decides to pivot. 9 July, 7pm.

The Great Brooklyn Sugar & Coffee War’:  In New York’s Kings County, no two were more powerful than Coffee King John Arbuckle and Sugar King Henry Osborne Havemeyer — 86 percent of the nation’s coffee and 98 percent of its sugar were roasted and refined in Brooklyn. Then Arbuckle decided to also get into the sugar industry. 9 July, 5:30pm, $10.

Art Deco New York and the Race to the Clouds’: While New York City was just about to enter the “Roaring Twenties,” the skyline followed. The story of oversized egos and overheated rivalries and NYC’s skyscraper boom. 13 July, 1pm, $10.

Murmrr Lit Presents Colin Jost, A Very Punchable Face: A witty observer of human behavior, Jost writes with razor-sharp comic timing about everything from his youth in Staten Island to Harvard at the dawn of Facebook to behind the scenes at SNL. 13 July, 7:30pm, $30.

Five Points, NYC's Most Notorious 19th-Century Slum’: Step back in time to explore the forgotten stories and historic remnants of Five Points, a 19th-century slum that was infamous for decades, described by Charles Dickens as where “poverty, wretchedness, and vice are rife.” 14 July, 12:30pm, $10.

92Y Presents David Mitchell, Utopia Avenue with David Byrne: Emerging from London’s psychedelic scene in 1967, Utopia Avenue embarked on a meteoric journey from the seedy clubs of Soho to the top of the charts. Mitchell’s kaleidoscopic novel tells the unexpurgated story of Utopia Avenue’s turbulent life and times and fame’s Faustian pact. 14 July, 6pm, $35.

Virtual Animal Meet & Greet with the Staten Island Zoo: A virtual trip to Staten Island Zoo, which contains more than 1,100 animals, and over 350 species from six of the world’s seven continents. 14 July, 3pm, $10.

The Untold Story of History's Greatest Women Cartoonists’: Uncover the greatest women cartoon artists up through the mid-20th century, from the author who wrote the definitive book on the topic. 14 July, 5:30pm, $10.

The Beer Barons & Breweries of Staten Island’: For nearly a century, beer production was one of the most prominent industries on Staten Island. Meet the beer barons and see the breweries that transformed the borough. 15 July, 1pm, $10.

‘The Secrets of TriBeCa: Lofts, Artists, & Alleyways’: Known today for its namesake film festival and high-end private homes, Tribeca was anything but fabulous for nearly 300 years. Meet the sailors, merchants, and artists that once called this neighborhood home. 16 July, 1 pm, $10.

The Untold History of Brooklyn Heights’: From its beginnings in the early 1800s as a retreat for wealthy New Yorkers to the modern neighborhood that looks much like it did 100 years ago, see the real Brooklyn Heights. 16 July, 5:30 pm, $10.

Through the Lens of Wild, Weird, and Wacky America: Take a road trip through the off-the-beaten-path USA from the country's best-preserved ghost town to Elvis in his Sunday Best. Through the lens of one award-winning photographer. 17 July, 1pm, $10.

The Secrets of Grand Central Terminal’: Grand Central has captivated people from around the world with its architectural beauty, but it’ also full of secrets — from being the target of a failed Nazi sabotage mission during WWII to containing hidden areas that keep it and its train traffic running each day. 20 June, 8pm. $10.

Underground Manhattan, The History of the NYC Subway System: Explore the oldest subway stations in New York City (virtually) working up from Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall station to Grand Central Terminal. Includes the art, architecture, and secrets hiding in plain sight. 21 July, 8pm. $10.

The Great Gatsby Estates’: A digital exploration of the magnificent estates and mansions of Long Island’s "Gold Coast" that are believed to have inspired The Great Gatsby, the classic 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that centered around one of the world's premier collections of glamour, luxury, and architectural achievement. 22 July, 5:30pm. $10.

NYC’s Tin Pan Alley: The Birthplace of America’s Music Industry’: A spotlight on the former New York City neighborhood of Tin Pan Alley, the birthplace of the American music industry, which produced some of the most prolific songwriters of the early 20th century. 23 July, 1pm. $10.

Spy City: The History of Espionage in New York City’: “Upon Secrecy, Success Depends,” or so said George Washington. From the Revolutionary War to the present day, covert ops have flourished in the five boroughs of Spy City. 27 July 8pm, $10.

Virtual Road Trip Down Route 66 with Pro Photographer Julien McRoberts: From classic roadside diners to desert ghost towns, explore the bygone era of one of America's most famous highways, through the lens of one award-winning photographer. 28 July, 5:30pm, $10.

‘Fear City: New York City in the 1970s & 1980s’: Artists and arsonists. Punk rockers and panicky bankers. Sex workers and serial killers. New York City in the 1970s and 1980s was a tale of two cities. The story of New York in its grittiest modern eras, from one local who experienced it all firsthand. 30 July, 8pm, $10.

NY Adventure Club Virtual Group Trivia Night: A virtual group trivia night that pits teams against one another to answer questions from diverse topics and themes. 31 July, 8pm, $10.

Marga Gomez recounts growing up brown and queer in Washington Heights, including sadistic nuns on poppers, childhood misdemeanors and parental post-nasal drip in Spanking Machine in the Dixon Place HOT Festival.

THEATRE + DANCE

Public Everywhere: Enjoy works from the Public Theatre specifically for this moment of unprecedented isolation, including What Do We Need To Talk About?, Latin History For Morons, Play At Home, Watch Me Work and Brave New Shakespeare Challenge.

59E59 Presents Hershey Felder, Beethoven (Live Broadcast): From Moonlight Sonata and Pathétique Sonata to selections from the 5th and 9th Symphonies, Beethoven features some of the composer's greatest works in an intense journey from Florence, Italy.12 July, 8pm, $56.

Dixon Place HOT Festival: Since 1992, this trailblazing summer festival sizzles with over 30 artists presenting queer theater, dance, music, literature, puppetry and comedy, including Marga Gomez on 16 July. The longest-running annual LGBTQ festival in the world. See DPTV (Dixon Place TV).

Untitled, Chicago, Illinois 1957 by Gordon Parks (American, 1912–2006). Showing on the website of MoMA as a part of the exhibit “Gordon Parks: Atmosphere of Crime”.

CANVAS

MoMA Virtual Views, Gordon Parks, “The Atmosphere of Crime”: Explore sParks’s powerful work, including his 1957 photography series The Atmosphere of Crime, and his legacy for today. Virtual Views, 16 July, 7pm.

Liu Xiaodong's Spring in New York:When Liu Xiaodong began making watercolors of locked-down New York, he was stranded here, with all flights to Beijing cancelled. April brought blossoming trees in a closed playground; in late May, Black Lives Matter protesters took to the streets. Lisson Gallery online exhibition.

Fotografiska New York + Hedges Projects Presents Andy Warhol Photographs: An online exhibition of Warhol’s Polaroid photographs from the 1970s to celebrate and commemorate Pride. The exhibition examines Warhol’s exploration of gender and identity through two series: Sex Parts and Torsos and Ladies and Gentlemen. Online.

Edward Hopper, Fondation Beyeler: Hopper’s iconic representations of the infinite expanse of American landscapes and cityscapes — key to understanding his work. Thru 26 July.

Andrew Bird plays a live streaming show on 25 July as a part of the My Finest Work Yet tour. My Finest Work Yet was nominated for “Best Folk Album” at the 2020 Grammy Awards.

MUSIC + COMEDY (STREAMING)

Rufus Wainwright, Unfollow the Rules Record Release Party: 11 July, 2pm

Ani DiFranco, Heavy Hitters Festival/Live Stream: 12 July, 4pm

Devon Gilfillian: 13 July, 3pm

Angel Olsen: 14 July, 3pm

Andrew Bird: 25 July, 8pm

SummerStage Anywhere: A new program that highlights genres of NYC, including Global Music Tuesdays, Indie Rock Wednesdays, Latin, Thursdays and Hip-Hop Fridays.

Becoming the Song profiles the openly gay Hong Kong singer and human rights activist Denise Ho and explores her remarkable journey from Cantopop superstar to activist.

CINEMA (STREAMING)

Film Forum Virtual: Watch some of the best films of the year from home and support Film at Lincoln Center. Select new releases:

  • Ursula von Rydingsvard, Into Her Own: The journey of Ursula von Rydingsvard (b. 1942) – her difficult early life in a family of nine emigrating to the US after five years in post-WWII German Displaced Persons camps, a traumatic first marriage, her arrival in 1970s New York to establish herself as an artist, and her staggering body of work.

  • Capital in the Twenty-First Century: Based on the international bestseller by economist Thomas Piketty, an eye-opening journey through wealth and power, a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress.

  • John Lewis, Good Trouble: Using interviews and rare archival footage, John Lewis: Good Trouble chronicles Lewis' 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health-care reform and immigration.

  • Quarantine Cat Film Festival: Culled from over 1,100 international submissions, brings together the cutest, funniest, bravest and most loving cat videos filmed during the 2020 quarantine.

Films at Lincoln Center Virtual Cinema: Watch some of the best films of the year from home and support Film at Lincoln Center. Select new releases:

  • Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets: On the eve of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, a Las Vegas dive bar becomes a stage where its employees and barflies commiserate one last time.

  • First Cow: A taciturn loner and skilled cook finds true connection with a Chinese immigrant and they collaborate on a successful business, although reliant upon the clandestine participation of a nearby landowner's prized milking cow. 

  • Mayak (The Lighthouse): Maria Saakyan's story unfolds in the '90s, against the backdrop of the Caucasus wars. As the scope of the conflict extends to one woman's small village, she is forced to drop everything, move to Moscow, and start over. 17 July.

OTHER STREAMING:

Olympia: Unfiltered documentary follows the life and career of academy-award-winning actress, Olympia Dukakis. Starting on the day she turns eighty and continuing for three years, this film deals with the struggles and pains surrounding identity and the roles placed on us by society. Amazon Prime.

Scheme Birds: See a fading steel town in Scotland through the eyes of Gemma, a soon-to-be mother on the verge of adulthood. In a place where you "either get knocked up or locked up," Gemma carves out brief moments of tenderness amidst the violence of her local scheme. Amazon Prime.

What She Said: The New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael battled to make her mark. An unvarnished portrait of a pioneer who was both admired and resented for what she said about art in an era of great movie-making. Amazon Prime.

The Truth:  Fabienne (Catherine Deneuve) is an aging French movie star who, despite her momentary lapses in memory, remains a venerable force. Upon the publication of her memoirs, her daughter Lumir (Juliette Binoche) returns from New York with her husband (Ethan Hawke) and their young daughter to commemorate its release. IFC Channel.

Black Magic for White Boys: Larry is an aging performer who desperately wants to save his struggling New York City theater. Oscar is an immature yuppie who accidentally gets his new girlfriend pregnant. Oscar's best friend Jamie is a real estate developer. What they all need is some magic to fix their predicaments. Amazon Prime.

Suzi Q: Before Suzi Quatro burst on the music world in 1973, there were almost no women in rock, and absolutely none who played bass and sang lead vocals and led the band and rocked out and reached millions of people around the world, re-writing the rule book for the expected image of women in rock & roll. Amazon Prime.

Inmate #1: The Rise Of Danny Trejo: Reveals the extraordinary life journey of Hollywood's most unlikely hero. From an early life of drugs, armed robbery and hard prison time, to the red carpets of Hollywood blockbusters and helping troubled addicts. Danny gives a first hand account of one of the greatest transformations put to film. Amazon Prime.

Becoming the Song: Profiles the openly gay Hong Kong singer and human rights activist Denise Ho and explores her remarkable journey from commercial Cantopop superstar to outspoken political activist, an artist who has put her life and career on the line to support the determined struggle of Hong Kong. Loft Cinema.

The Mighty Oak: Music manager Gina Jackson whose life is shattered when her brother and lead vocalist, Vaughn is killed in a tragic accident. Ten years later, when a young guitar prodigy Oak Scoggins enters her orbit, she becomes convinced that this young man is the reincarnation of Vaughn, but is he? Amazon Prime.

See Mardy Fish, coach Luke Jensen and the rest of the New York Empire compete in World Team Tennis returning on 13 July on CBS Sports Network, Tennis Channel or ESPN+.

SPORT

World Team Tennis: Watch the Washington Kastles — led by 23-time Grand Slam winner (seven singles titles) and four-time Olympic gold medalist Venus Williams and young American star Frances Tiafoe — and the Vegas Rollers — anchored by Bob and Mike Bryan, the winningest doubles team in tennis history — take on six more teams from around the country. 12-30 July, CBS Sports Network, Tennis Channel or ESPN+.

New York Mets:

v. Atlanta Braves: 24-25 July, 4pm; 26 July, 7pm

v. Boston Red Sox: 29-30 July, 7pm.

See Ticket policies.

New York City Football Club: In Florida, beginning 8 July. Schedule here.

NY*Confidential, What's On: The Amateur Fireworks Edition

Nighttime fireworks heard in many Brooklyn neighborhoods these days aren’t as grand as this display at the Brooklyn Bridge, but they still make plenty of noise. Photo: Brooklyn Eagle

Greetings, NY*Confidants!

Happy Fourth! We have made it this far… It’s been a week, with Broadway announcing it will not resume until 2021 and Major League Baseball still not decided on its season. But at least we have the fireworks. Thanks, Mayor Bill. Of course, those of us in at least four boroughs have seen the fireworks on our streets (literally) for about a month now, Macy’s would not disappoint. It is putting on five “mini” shows across the city, culminating on Saturday night. Make sure the bed remains unobstructed for pets.

Another week, another small concession to reopening, including new drive-in movie theaters. Tribeca Enterprises is now showing outdoor films at Orchard Beach each weekend running through 2 August. It joins Nickerson Beach in Nassau County beginning 9 July at $26 per vehicle, the Bel Aire Diner in Astoria and the Uptown Drive-In festival in the Yankee Stadium parking lot. So far, the Skyline Drive-In  in Greenpoint has a slate of classic movies at a greater cost, but people can sit outside their Zipcars.

Finally, although the Stonewall Inn was saved by a $250K donation that from the Gill Foundation — “one of the nation's leading funders of efforts to secure full equality” — other LGBT bars, such as Cubby Hole, Henrietta Hudson and Ginger’s are struggling with doors closed for at least three months. Buy a drink, or donate online for one of these other landmarks of the city.

Portions of What’s On: NY*Confidential reside on www.nyconfidant.com and Facebook

Pass it on and support the artistic community. We do it for love, but must survive.

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From major commissions to pop-up pieces on the side of buildings, mural art has gone hand-in-hand with NYC ever since the mid-20th century. Explore this super-sized artistic medium on 8 July in 'The Great Murals of New York City' Webinar.

BOOK READINGS, TOURS + PERFORMANCE

UNLESS STATED, EVENTS ARE FREE; TIMES ARE EDT

Greenlight Bookstore Reopening Party: An all-star lineup of novelists, essayists, poets, and other creative folks will read new and old work to celebrate the power of books to bring us together and help us find a way forward. 2 July, 7:30pm, $20.

Virtual Talk, Behind the Curtain, The Birth of Broadway: A unique look at New York City’s earliest theaters — the birth of Broadway — through images of its locations, its builders and managers, and the actors who made history on its stages. 2 July, 2pm.

‘Out of Body Experiences' Webinar w/ Sci-fi Author Jon Womack: Have you ever dreamt you could fly? Do our loved ones await us on the "Other Side?" Set sail on a journey into noetic realms and past lives. 2 July, 1pm, $10.

Strand Presents John Fram, The Bright Lands: Friday nights are sacred; the people of Bentley gather in devotion to the vigor of their boys on display. But when their all-star quarterback, Dylan Whitley goes missing, an unwelcome but familiar gloom returns to Texas. 6 July, 7pm, Register.

'The Secrets of Grand Central Terminal’ Webinar: Grand Central has captivated people from around the world with its architectural beauty, but it’s also full of secrets — from being the target of a failed Nazi sabotage mission to its train traffic sectors. 6 July, 8pm. $10.

Strand Presents, Hank Green, A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor: The follow-up to the best-selling An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, a fast-paced adventure that is also a biting social commentary, asking hard, urgent questions about the way we live, our freedoms, our future, and how we handle the unknown. 6 July, 7pm.

Underground Manhattan, The History of the NYC Subway System: Explore the oldest subway stations in New York City (virtually) working up from Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall station to Grand Central Terminal. Includes the art, architecture, and secrets hiding in plain sight. 7 July, 8pm. $10.

Powerhouse Books Presents Blake Butler, Alice Knott: The theft and destruction of eight internationally famous works of art, including a priceless de Kooning, takes place in the home of Alice, a reclusive heiress and art collector. As the press descends upon her home, Alice becomes a primary suspect. 7 July, 7pm.

Community Bookstore Presents Tana Wojczuk Lady Romeo: In the tradition of Jill Lepore's Book of Ages, a biography of 19th-century queer actress Charlotte Cushman, whose cross-dressing Shakespearean performances and radical lifestyle made headlines across America. 7 July, 7:30pm.

The Great Murals of New York City’ Webinar: From major commissions to pop-up pieces on the side of buildings, mural art has gone hand-in-hand with NYC ever since the mid-20th century. Explore this super-sized artistic medium. 8 July, 1pm. $10.

Powerhouse Presents Larry Tye, Demagogue: Senator Joe McCarthy’s personal and professional papers, his medical and military records —all have been under lock and key for 70 years. Until now. Meet the senator undone by boozing and vengefulness. 8 July, 8pm.

The Silver Age of Comics: Rise of the Black Superhero’ Webinar: Explore the Silver Age of comic books, a period between 1956-1970 that introduced hyper-realistic black superheroes into real-world settings, including The Black Panther (1965), The Falcon (1969), and John Stewart of the Green Lantern series (1971). 8 July, 8pm, $10.

Modern Fashion 101 + How to Dress Confidently’ Webinar: Being fashionable isn't about wearing a three-piece suit or designer dress; it’s about getting a curated style. One fashion industry vet reveals the craft of developing that look. 9 July, 1pm, $10.

Community Bookstore Presents Andrew Martin, Cool for America: A humorous collection of overlapping stories that explores the dark zone between artistic ambition and its achievements, bookended by the misadventures of Leslie, a young woman, who moves from New York to Missoula, Montana to beat lingering depression. 9 July, 7:30pm.

Powerhouse Presents Diane Cardwell, Rockaway: Unmoored by a failed marriage and disconnected from her high-octane life in the city, Diane Cardwell finds herself staring at a small group of surfers coasting through mellow waves toward shore. She decides to pivot. 9 July, 7pm.

The Great Brooklyn Sugar & Coffee War’ Webinar:  In New York’s Kings County, no two were more powerful than Coffee King John Arbuckle and Sugar King Henry Osborne Havemeyer — 86 percent of the nation’s coffee and 98 percent of its sugar were roasted and refined in Brooklyn. Then Arbuckle decided to also get into the sugar industry. 9 July, 5:30pm, $10.

Art Deco New York and the Race to the Clouds’ Webinar: While New York City was just about to enter the “Roaring Twenties,” the skyline followed. The story of oversized egos and overheated rivalries and NYC’s skyscraper boom. 13 July, 1pm, $10.

Murmrr Lit Presents Colin Jost, A Very Punchable Face: A witty observer of human behavior, Jost writes with razor-sharp comic timing about everything from his youth in Staten Island to Harvard at the dawn of Facebook to behind the scenes at SNL. 13 July, 7:30pm, $30.

Five Points, NYC's Most Notorious 19th-Century Slum’ Webinar: Step back in time to explore the forgotten stories and historic remnants of Five Points, a 19th-century slum that was infamous for decades, described by Charles Dickens as where “poverty, wretchedness, and vice are rife.” 14 July, 12:30pm, $10.

92Y Presents David Mitchell, Utopia Avenue with David Byrne: Emerging from London’s psychedelic scene in 1967, Utopia Avenue embarked on a meteoric journey from the seedy clubs of Soho to the top of the charts. Mitchell’s kaleidoscopic novel tells the unexpurgated story of Utopia Avenue’s turbulent life and times and fame’s Faustian pact. 14 July, 6pm, $35.

The Untold Story of History's Greatest Women Cartoonists’ Webinar: Uncover the greatest women cartoon artists up through the mid-20th century, from the author who wrote the definitive book on the topic. 14 July, 5:30pm, $10.

The Beer Barons & Breweries of Staten Island’ Webinar: For nearly a century, beer production was one of the most prominent industries on Staten Island. Meet the beer barons and see the breweries that transformed the borough. 15 July, 1pm, $10.

‘The Secrets of TriBeCa: Lofts, Artists, & Alleyways’ Webinar: Known today for its namesake film festival and high-end private homes, Tribeca was anything but fabulous for nearly 300 years. Meet the sailors, merchants, and artists that once called this neighborhood home. 16 July, 1 pm, $10.

The Untold History of Brooklyn Heights’ Webinar: From its beginnings in the early 1800s as a retreat for wealthy New Yorkers to the modern neighborhood that looks much like it did 100 years ago, see the real Brooklyn Heights. 16 July, 5:30 pm, $10.

Through the Lens of Wild, Weird, and Wacky America: Take a road trip through the off-the-beaten-path USA from the country's best-preserved ghost town to Elvis in his Sunday Best. Through the lens of one award-winning photographer. 17 July, 1pm, $10.

Enjoy works from the Public Theatre specifically for this moment of unprecedented isolation, including the highly touted Much Ado About Nothing starring Danielle Brooks from the 2019 Shakespeare in the Park season.

THEATRE + DANCE + PODCASTS

Public Everywhere: Enjoy works from the Public Theatre specifically for this moment of unprecedented isolation, including What Do We Need To Talk About?, Latin History For Morons, Play At Home, Watch Me Work and Brave New Shakespeare Challenge.

59E59 Presents Hershey Felder, Beethoven (Live Broadcast): From Moonlight Sonata and Pathétique Sonata to selections from the 5th and 9th Symphonies, Beethoven features some of the composer's greatest works in an intense journey from Florence, Italy.12 July, 8pm, $56.

Dixon Place HOT Festival: Since 1992, this trailblazing summer festival sizzles with over 30 artists presenting queer theater, dance, music, literature, puppetry and comedy, including Marga Gomez on 16 July. The longest-running annual LGBTQ festival in the world. See DPTV (Dixon Place TV).

The Room Plays: A series of short plays by the Eden Theatre Company that take place in the rooms that “we create for ourselves, and the rooms from which we have no immediate exit.” First up, was the Bedroom Plays, still streaming on YouTube, followed by the Living Room on 16 July and the Bathroom in August.

Molière in the Park Presents Tartuffe: Tartuffe is a dubiously pious crook, happy to use the bible as a prop for personal gain. Orgon is a naive, lost, and aging patriarch, lusting for his fleeting power. When these two forces meet in Molière’s timely satire, division and chaos take over, until lies are exposed. Streaming.

Liu Xiaodong began making watercolors of locked-down New York while he was stranded here, with all flights to Beijing cancelled. See his prodigious talent in a new show at Lisson Gallery online.

CANVAS

Liu Xiaodong's Spring in New York:When Liu Xiaodong began making watercolors of locked-down New York, he was stranded here, with all flights to Beijing cancelled. April brought blossoming trees in a closed playground; in late May, Black Lives Matter protesters took to the streets. Lisson Gallery online exhibition.

MoMA Virtual Views, Video Lives: This week, artist Sharon Hayes shares an excerpt from her new project, which records a group discussion with two Dallas-based women's football teams on pleasure and pain, sport and life. Live Q&A with video artist Joan Jonas, as they discuss seven works by some of today’s most important video artists. 2 July, 7pm.

Fotografiska New York + Hedges Projects Presents Andy Warhol Photographs: An online exhibition of Warhol’s Polaroid photographs from the 1970s to celebrate and commemorate Pride. The exhibition examines Warhol’s exploration of gender and identity through two series: Sex Parts and Torsos and Ladies and Gentlemen. Online.

Felix Gonzalez-Torres, “Untitled’’ (Fortune Cookie Corner): In an era of social distancing, can a fortune cookie help bring us together? That question, is at the core of a new exhibition by the late artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres.

Don’t mourn CityParks Foundation SummerStage. See many interesting programs, including Fab5Freddy from the days of YoMTVRaps, throughout the summer.

MUSIC (STREAMING)

SummerStage Anywhere: A new program that highlights genres of NYC, including Global Music Tuesdays, Indie Rock Wednesdays, Latin, Thursdays and Hip-Hop Fridays.

In a world in which we must all live six feet apart, only one thing will bring us together…

CINEMA (STREAMING)

Film Forum Virtual: Watch some of the best films of the year from home and support Film at Lincoln Center. Select new releases:

  • Quarantine Cat Film Festival: Culled from over 1,100 international submissions, brings together the cutest, funniest, bravest and most loving cat videos filmed during the 2020 quarantine.

  • Shirley: Renowned horror writer Shirley Jackson (Elisabeth Moss) is on the precipice of writing her masterpiece when the arrival of newlyweds upends her routine and heightens tensions in her tempestuous relationship with her philandering husband.

  • My Darling Vivian: In 1951, Catholic schoolgirl Vivian Liberto meets Johnny Cash, the two marry in 1954. By 1961, Cash is a household name and perpetually on tour. Meanwhile, Vivian is pushed to the breaking point. Meet the first Mrs. Cash.

Films at Lincoln Center Virtual Cinema: Watch some of the best films of the year from home and support Film at Lincoln Center. Select new releases:

  • John Lewis, Good Trouble: Using interviews and rare archival footage, John Lewis: Good Trouble chronicles Lewis' 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health-care reform and immigration. 3 July.

  • Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets: On the eve of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, a Las Vegas dive bar becomes a stage where its employees and barflies commiserate one last time. 10 July.

  • Mayak (The Lighthouse): Maria Saakyan's story unfolds in the '90s, against the backdrop of the Caucasus wars. As the scope of the conflict extends to one woman's small village, she is forced to drop everything, move to Moscow, and start over. 17 July.

OTHER STREAMING:

To the Stars: In god-fearing Oklahoma, Iris endures the booze-induced antics of her mother and daily doses of bullying. She finds solace in Maggie, the charismatic new girl at school. When Maggie's mysterious past is discovered, the tiny community panics, leaving Iris to stand up for her friend. Hulu.

Palm Springs: When carefree Nyles (Andy Samberg) and reluctant maid of honor Sarah (Cristin Milioti) have a chance encounter at a Palm Springs wedding, things get complicated when they find themselves unable to escape the venue, themselves, or each other. Hulu.

Resistance: Before he was the world-famous mime Marcel Marceau, he was Marcel Mangel, an aspiring Jewish actor who joined the French Resistance to save the lives of thousands of children orphaned at the hands of the Nazis. Jesse Eisenberg stars in this compelling drama. Amazon Prime.

The Last Tree:Femi, a British boy of Nigerian heritage, moves to inner London to live with his mum. Struggling with the unfamiliar culture, teenage Femi has to figure out which path to adulthood he wants to take, and what it means to be a young black man in London. Amazon Prime.

House of Hummingbird: Set against the backdrop of a rapidly expanding Seoul in 1994, a lonely 14-year-old Eun-hee moves through life like a hummingbird searching for a taste of sweetness wherever she may find it. When Young-ji, a new teacher, arrives, she becomes the first adult Eun-hee feels really understands her. Loft Cinema.

What She Said: The New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael battled to make her mark. An unvarnished portrait of a pioneer who was both admired and resented for what she said about art in an era of great movie-making. Amazon Prime.

See Mardy Fish, coach Luke Jensen and the rest of the New York Empire compete in World Team Tennis returning on 13 July on CBS Sports Network, Tennis Channel or ESPN+.

SPORT

World Team Tennis: Watch the Washington Kastles — led by 23-time Grand Slam winner (seven singles titles) and four-time Olympic gold medalist Venus Williams and young American star Frances Tiafoe — and the Vegas Rollers — anchored by Bob and Mike Bryan, the winningest doubles team in tennis history — take on six more teams from around the country. 12-30 July, CBS Sports Network, Tennis Channel or ESPN+.

PremierLeague: Will the Aston Villa return to the Championship League? Will Man City take second? Can anyone outdo Liverpoool? For four more weeks, England’s favorite sport is back. NBC Sports.

OTHER SPORTS RETURN (TO TV):

WNBA: “Late July”, IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla.

2020 PGA Tour: 6-9 Aug, Harding Park in the Bay Area.

NY*Confidential Presents: The Juneteenth Edition

Juneteenth celebration in 1900 at Eastwoods Park. Credit: National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Greetings NY*Confidants!

In the past, the general population of the U.S. has sort of brushed aside many holidays that celebrate black history. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was a battle in the 1990s, as was Black History Month. But things changed thanks to some old fashioned protest and policy changes. Change is taking place again. Governor Mario Cuomo has declared Juneteenth, America’s second Independence Day celebrating the end of slavery, a state holiday — events have been planned all over the city. Would this have happened were it not for the historic protests in the wake of George Floyd’s death? It’s questionable. It seems as if people of color have to fight for every right that the rest of us take for granted. But all of us can rally behind this effort. I know I will be taking part in the Juneteenth 5k/Bike Ride in Brooklyn. Other events:

  • Manhattan: Several activist groups are putting on rallies in Washington Square Park beginning at 10am. Activists will gather at Broadway and Park Place and then march toward City Hall for speeches. 2 to 5pm.

  • Brooklyn and Bronx: At 6pm, marchers will gather at Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn and march through Flatbush to Fort Greene Park for various performances. JusticeforGeorgeNYC is staging a protest at Soundview Park in the Bronx at 3pm.

  • Brownsville Heritage House will hold gospel performances, slavery exhibits, garden tours, dances, works from local artists and more. 581 Mother Gaston Blvd, 2nd Floor, 6 to 8pm on 19 June; 12 to 8pm on 20-21 June.

  • SummerStage Anywhere digital series will honor Juneteenth, with a free digital day of dance. At 7pm the YouTube channel will feature a panel discussion, Reflecting the Times, followed by a tribute performance of “Hanging Tree” — a solo dedicated to the transatlantic slave trade — featuring Jamel Gaines Creative Outlet Dance Theatre.

  • Juneteenth Celebration for the Culture is an outdoor, socially distant Juneteenth celebration. Guests are encouraged to bring a blanket, snacks and beverages to the 125th Street Entrance of West Harlem Piers for games and other amusements. 20 June, noon.

Enjoy your Juneteenth, everyone, and stand up for others!

Share NY*Confidential

Portions of What’s On: NY*Confidential reside on www.nyconfidant.com and Facebook.
Pass it on and support the artistic community. We do it for love, but must survive.

The New York subway contains a first-rate art museum. Get up close and personal with a selection created for MTA Arts & Design.

BOOK READINGS, TOURS + PERFORMANCE

UNLESS STATED, EVENTS ARE FREE; TIMES ARE EDT

NY Adventure Club Virtual Group Trivia Night: A virtual group trivia night that pits teams against one another to answer questions from diverse topics and themes. 18 June, 8pm, $10.

Virtual Speed Dating with littlefield x Filter Off: Create authentic connections during your quarantine! Buy a ticket, download the Filter Off app and set up a profile for pre-selected dates.18 June, 8pm, Donation.

Pop-Up Magazine, Spring Issue, At Home: Two months ago, Allison, a newly graduated medical student in New York was thrust into being a doctor in the midst of the pandemic. Allison shares her story with Emily Silverman, host of The Nocturnists podcast.

Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution'‘Webinar: Explore several decades of Rock & Roll history through the life of Bill Graham, one of the most legendary rock promoters who launched the biggest names in rock. 19 June, 1pm, $10.

The Greene Space Presents Micropolis, World Refugee Day: Together with the UN Refugee Agency, WNYC reporter Matt Katz hosts an enlightening live conversation with UNHCR Director Ruvendrini Menikdiwela and refugee activists Hala Haj Taleb, Asif Safdary and Nhial Deng. 19 June, 3pm, Live.

Japanese Whisky Tasting: Nikka and Suntory are the biggest players in Japanese whisky, but aren't the only ones. Whisky distilling in Japan actually dates back to the 1400s, and is also just as expansive as powerhouse whisky regions Scotland and Ireland. 19 June, 8pm, $10.

The Greene Space Presents Juneteenth Celebration: WNYC highlights urgent and thought-provoking performances and conversations by Black Americans. Featuring  Nikole Hannah Jones, Savion Glover, Misty Copeland, Wynton Marsalis, Cornel West and many others. 19 June, 7pm.

The Secrets of Grand Central Terminal’ Webinar: Grand Central has captivated people from around the world with its architectural beauty, but it’s also full of secrets — from being the target of a failed Nazi sabotage mission during WWII to the hidden that keep train traffic running. 22 June, 8pm. $10.

Greenlight Bookstore Presents Rosalie Knecht, Who Is Vera Kelly: When ex-CIA agent Vera Kelly loses her job and her girlfriend in a single day, she reluctantly becomes a private detective. Heartbroken and cash-strapped, she takes a case that dredges up dark memories and attracts dangerous characters. 22 June, 7:30pm.

Alphonse Mucha: The Illustrator Who Changed the World of Advertising:A virtual journey through the Paris portion of Alphonse Mucha's career, and the exhibition Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau / Nouvelle Femme. 23 June, 5:30pm. $10.

Greenlight Bookstore Presents Kyle McCarthy, Everyone Knows How Much I Love You: Following their reunion, former best friends Rose and Lacie fall into an intense, uneasy friendship. But the difference between fiction and fact begins to blur, and Rose soon finds herself repeating the worst moments of her and Lacie’s lives. 23 June, 7:30pm.

Underground Manhattan, The History of the NYC Subway System: Explore the oldest subway stations in New York City working up from Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall station to Grand Central Terminal. Includes the art, architecture and secrets hiding in plain sight. 23 June, 8pm, $10.

‘The Secrets of TriBeCa: Lofts, Artists, & Alleyways’ Webinar: Known today for its namesake film festival and high-end private homes, it was anything but for nearly 300 years. This is the real story of the sailors, merchants and artists that once called this neighborhood home. 24 June, 1 pm, $10.

ART on Lockdown: As governments across the Latin America implement harsh measures in response, see three artists from its art organizations discuss making art in the time of COVID-19. 24 June, 12 pm.

Five Points, NYC’s Most Notorious 19th-Century Slum’ Webinar: Step back in time to explore the forgotten stories and historic remnants of Five Points, a 19th-century slum described by Charles Dickens as where “poverty, wretchedness, and vice are rife.” 24 June, 5:30pm, $10.

Powerhouse Books Presents Alicia Yin Cheng, This Is What Democracy Looked Like: A visual history of U.S. ballots from the 19th and early 20th centuries that reveals unregulated and, at times, absurd designs reflecting the changing times. 25 June, 7pm.

The Ultimate Virtual Wine Crash Course with Sommelier Amy Karasavas: While some people spend their lives trying to understand everything about wine, one NYC-based sommelier focuses on the basics: 25 June, 8pm, $10.

The History of Fashion Exhibitions, From Bland to Blockbusters’ Webinar: When the Costume Institute was added to The Met in 1946, it was blah. That changed when Diana Vreeland, former Editor-in-Chief of Vogue, joined the museum in 1972. See the story. 26 June, 1pm, $10.

Virtual Murder Mystery with the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum: Find out whose skeleton has been discovered at the historic Mount Vernon Hotel, an experience that pits teams against one another to solve the murder. 26 June, 8pm, $10.

Virtual Animal Meet & Greet with the Staten Island Zoo: A virtual trip to Staten Island Zoo, which contains more than 1,100 animals, and over 350 species from six of the world’s seven continents. 30 June, 3pm, $10.

MTA Arts & Design: NYC's Great Underground Art Museum’ Webinar: The New York subway contains a first-rate art museum comprised of works created in mosaic, terra cotta, bronze, glass, and mixed-media sculpture, making it one of the greatest free art galleries in the world. Get up close and personal. 30 June, 5:30pm, $10.

‘Out of Body Experiences’ Webinar w/ Sci-fi Author Jon Womack: Have you ever dreamt you could fly? Do our loved ones await us on the “Other Side?” Set sail on a journey into noetic realms and past lives. 2 July, 1pm, $10.

History of Jazz in NYC’ Webinar & 78rpm Listening Party: From Harlem'‘ mob-run night clubs in the 1920s, to the narrow basement joints lining 52nd Street, New York would eventually become the undisputed Jazz Capital of America. 1 July, 8pm, $10.

See Online streams of select Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts featuring Broadway productions, including Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel. A new show every Friday.

THEATRE + DANCE + PODCASTS

Love from BAM, Watermill: Jerome Robbins’ piece follows a male figure through scenes from his youth, each moment of his journey framed by lunar transitions — a rumination on experience and memory, named for the beloved Long Island town. 18 June.

Public Everywhere: Enjoy works from the Public Theatre specifically for this moment of unprecedented isolation, including What Do We Need To Talk About?, Latin History For Morons, Play At Home, Watch Me Work and Brave New Shakespeare Challenge.

Joe’s Pub, Live from the Archives: While Joe's Pub is temporarily closed to public access – a free series of live-streamed and archived performances from its iconic stage. Includes Spirit Night, Isaac Oliver and Make Music New York.

Faith Ringgold’s American People Series #20: Die. Created in the summer of 1967, during waves of civil unrest, the final work in Ringgold’s American People Series, unflinchingly confronts race relations. Ringgold discusses it with MoMA on 18 June.

CANVAS

MoMA Virtual Views, Faith Ringgold: live Q&A: “How could I as an African-American woman artist document what was happening all around me?” asked Faith Ringgold in speaking about American People Series #20: Die. Created in the summer of 1967 the work unflinchingly confronts race relations. Ringgold discusses it with MoMa. 18 June, 8pm.

Felix Gonzalez-Torres, “Untitled’’ (Fortune Cookie Corner): In an era of social distancing, can a fortune cookie help bring us together? That question, is at the core of a new exhibition by the late artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres.

Edward Hopper,Fondation Beyeler: Hopper’s iconic representations of the infinite expanse of American landscapes and cityscapes — key to understanding his work. Thru 26 July.

An ode to the Governor’s Ball, which was cancelled this year. Enjoy some indoor concerts.

MUSIC + COMEDY (STREAMING)

SummerStage Anywhere: SummerStage will not take place in May and June, per City restrictions. In the meantime, new live performances and original content are on the website every week.

  • LAMC at SummerStage: A showcase featuring key voices from the Latin LGBTQ+ community including pop singer Kany Garcia, hip hop artist Mabiland, indie electro pop musician Javiera Mena, and rock band Circo. 18 June, 8pm.

LIVE CONCERTS

Ticketmaster, BoweryPresents, LiveNation

Lupe Fiasco Presents Food & Liquor: 28-29 June, Brooklyn Steel

Film Forum is still closed, but stream all of its unique blend of movies on your small screen.

CINEMA (STREAMING)

Film Forum Virtual: Watch some of the best films of the year from home and support Film at Lincoln Center. Select new releases:

  • Shirley: Renowned horror writer Shirley Jackson (Elisabeth Moss) is on the precipice of writing her masterpiece when the arrival of newlyweds upends her routine and heightens tensions in her tempestuous relationship with her philandering husband.

  • Sorry We Missed You: After losing their home in a financial crisis, Ricky and Abby trade the car for a van, so Ricky can work as a delivery driver. The advantages of being self-employed come with meeting impossible deadlines with no margin for error.

  • What She Said, The Art of Pauline Kael: In a field that embraced few women film critics, Kael was controversial, witty, and fiercely discerning. Her decades-long berth at The New Yorker energized her fans (“Paulettes”) and infuriated her detractors on a weekly basis.

  • My Darling Vivian: In 1951, Catholic schoolgirl Vivian Liberto meets Air Force cadet Johnny Cash, the two marry in 1954 and within a year, a family is started. By 1961, Johnny Cash is a household name and perpetually on tour. Meanwhile, Vivian is pushed to the breaking point when she is targeted by hate groups over a mistaken perception that she is black. Meet the first Mrs. Cash.

Human Rights Watch Film Festival: For 31 years, the HRW Festivalhas been presenting a diverse and empowering selection of films to audiences across the world.

  • Reunited: A story of love across borders, and the compromises a family must make when they are torn apart by circumstances beyond their control. 20 June, 3:30pm.

Resistance: Before he was the world-famous mime Marcel Marceau, he was Marcel Mangel, an aspiring Jewish actor who joined the French Resistance to save the lives of thousands of children orphaned at the hands of the Nazis. Jesse Eisenberg stars in this compelling drama. IFC.

On the Record: The story of music executive Drew Dixon as she grapples with her decision to become one of the first women of color, in the wake of #MeToo, to come forward and publicly accuse hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons of sexual assault. HBO/Max.

John Lewis, Good Trouble: Using interviews and rare archival footage, John Lewis: Good Trouble chronicles Lewis' 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health-care reform and immigration. 3 July.

Mayak (The Lighthouse): Maria Saakyan's elegiac, semi-autobiographical The Lighthouse unfolds in the very early '90s, against the backdrop of the Caucasus wars that plagued Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan. As the scope of this mass-scaled conflict extends itself to one woman's small village, she is forced to drop everything, move to Moscow, and start over from scratch. 3 July.

Black Lives Matter is seen on the back of Aston Villa players’ shirts. The Premier League has returned to NBC Sports.

SPORT

PremierLeague: For six weeks, England’s favorite sport is back, sans fans. NBC Sports.

French Open, A Tribute: In 1980, the Fédération Française de Tennis partnered with Galerie Lelong & Co. to begin a series of annual poster designs with commissioned works by contemporary artists from around the world. Through these diverse art pieces, the creators demonstrate how the sport of tennis itself can be an art. Online, Int’l Tennis Hall of Fame.

NY*Confidential What's On: The Power + PRIDE Edition

A Self-Portrait by Jordan Casteel depicts the artist, her medium and her struggles with lupus before she became an artist-in-residence program at Harlem’s Studio Museum.

NY*Confidants,

Normally, we would be celebrating Pride month, a month that all New Yorkers seem to love and revel in, whether LGBTQ+ or not. Instead, 50 years after Stonewall and 100 years after the initial sparks of the Civil Rights movement, Pride is backlisted as black and mixed-race Americans continue to fight for equal treatment in the streets.

With that in mind, NY*Conifidental is highlighting as much of the multi-racial experience as possible this newsletter starting with the work of Jordan Casteel in her first exhibit at the New Museum. Casteel’s practice explores humanity, sexuality, identity, and subjectivity, and she has almost exclusively painted black subjects. A graduate of the Yale program of Fine Arts, she has been compared to painters Jacob Lawrence, Nancy Spero, and Henri Matisse. Casteel has said her intent is “to expose my vision of black men as a sister, daughter, friend and lover. That perspective is one full of empathy and love. I see their humanity and, in turn, I want the audience to engage with them…”

In the meantime, although it should not take a national tragedy to talk about and highlight black-owned and human rights-centered businesses, here are a couple of places to visit and places to donate to help the cause, including antiracist reading lists for both grown-ups and kids, and places for donations, including Bail FundsMutual Aid societies, Black-owned bookstores, and the NAACP, the Audre Lorde Project, and the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. Finally, a Pride month list for LGBTQ+ readers.

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Get your kicks on 66 from classic roadside diners to desert ghost towns through the lens of one award-winning photographer.

BOOK READINGS, TOURS + PERFORMANCE, ETC.

Virtual Talk, Windows on the World, the Lost Culinary Marvel: Untapped New York tour guide, John DeSanto will share his story as one of the first servers to open the restaurant to his rise to wait-staff captain during a 10-year career that spanned New York's most tumultuous times. 4 June, 12pm.

The Lost + Forgotten Gilded Age Mansions of Fifth Avenue’ Webinar: The story from the first residence on the still unpaved street in 1834, to the prominent families that once defined New York’s most famous avenue. 4 June, 5:30 pm, $10.

Virtual Talk, Secrets of the High Line: “Walk” the length of the High Line from the Whitney Museum past the Chelsea Market and the Empire State, hopping from season to season and seeing highlights along the way. 4 June, 12pm.

‘The Secrets of TriBeCa: Lofts, Artists, & Alleyways' Webinar: Known today for its namesake film festival, celebrity sightings and high-end homes, it was anything but for nearly 300 years. This is the real story of the sailors, merchants, and artists that once called the neighborhood home. 5 June, 1 pm, $10.

Best of the New York Guitar Festival, including Kaki King, Sharon Isbin: Exploring virtually every aspect of the guitar’s personality, the New York Guitar Festival has presented many of the world’s most influential guitarists at iconic venues across the city for more than 20 years. 5 June, 4pm.

The Ultimate Virtual Wine Crash Course with Sommelier Amy Karasavas: While some people spend their lives trying to understand everything about wine, one NYC-based sommelier has a crash course on the basics: 5 June, 8pm, $10.

Underground Manhattan, The History of the NYC Subway System: Explore the oldest subway stations in New York City working up from Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall station to Grand Central Terminal. Includes the art, architecture and secrets hiding in plain sight. 9 June, 8pm, $10.

Community Bookstore Presents NYRB Discussion of Cyprian Ekwensi’s People of the City, with Emmanuel Iduma: Ekwensi’s early masterpiece is the tale of Amusa Sango, a young man who travels from the country to the big city, where he means to make a career as a crime reporter while leading a dance band. Iduma is the author of A Stranger’s Pose, a book of travel stories. 9 June, 6pm.

The Great Brooklyn Sugar + Coffee War’ Webinar: At the turn of the 20th century, no two were more powerful than Coffee King John Arbuckle and Sugar King Henry Osborne Havemeyer, as 86 percent of the nation’s coffee and 98 percent of its sugar were roasted and refined in Brooklyn. But when Arbuckle decided to also get into the sugar industry, the Great Brooklyn Sugar + Coffee War began. 9 June, 1pm, $10.

Exploring the Remnants of Five Points, NYC's Notorious 19th-Century Slum: Back in the 19th century, the neighborhood of Five Points was internationally known as one of the world's most notorious slums, described by Charles Dickens as where “poverty, wretchedness, and vice are rife.” 10 June, 1pm, $10.

Books Are Magic Presents Alysia Li Ying Sawchyn, A Fish Growing Lungs: At age 18 Alysia Sawchyn was diagnosed with bipolar. Seven years later she learned she had been misdiagnosed. A Fish Growing Lungs is made up of essays that reflect on Sawchyn's diagnosis and its unraveling, the process of recovery and the search for identity. 10 June, 7pm.

Virtual Road Trip Down Route 66 with Pro Photographer Julien McRoberts: From classic roadside diners to desert ghost towns, explore the bygone era of one of America's most famous highways, through the lens of one award-winning photographer. 11 June, 8pm, $10.

Community Bookstore Presents Magnetized with translator Samuel Rutter: Over the course of one ghostly week in September 1982, the bodies of four taxi drivers were found in Buenos Aires. The assailant: a 19-year-old boy, odd and taciturn. More than 30 years later, Busqued began visiting Ricardo Melogno, the serial killer, in prison. 11 June, 7:30pm.

Virtual Murder Mystery with the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum: An unidentified skeleton has been discovered at the Mount Vernon Hotel. Who was killed? Work with your team of fellow detectives to unravel the mystery. 12 June, 8pm, $10.

Drink + Draw, Learning to Draw Letters Like a Pro: Chad Jey will detail the background and art form of lettering and sign painting, including structure, different lettering forms and styles. Then jump into lettering. 13 June, 5:30pm, Donation.

Virtual Animal Meet & Greet with the Staten Island Zoo: A virtual trip to Staten Island Zoo, which contains more than 1,100 animals, and over 350 species from six of the world’s seven continents. 16 June, 3pm, $10.

Spy City: The History of Espionage in New York City’ Webinar: “Upon Secrecy, Success Depends,” or so said George Washington. From the Revolutionary War to the present day, covert ops have flourished in the five boroughs of Spy City. 17 June, 1pm, $10.

Books Are Magic Presents Madeline Miller, Circe: In the house of Helios, a daughter is born. But Circe is not powerful, like her father, nor alluring like her mother. Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her craft, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying of the Olympians. 17 June, 7pm.

Virtual Speed Dating with Littlefield + Filter Off: Create authentic connections during your quarantine! Buy a ticket, download the Filter Off app and set up pre-selected dates. At the event, participants have 100 seconds to connect on a FaceTime-style video. 18 June, 8pm, Donation.

NY Adventure Club Virtual Group Trivia Night: A virtual group trivia night that pits teams against one another to answer questions from diverse topics and themes. 19 June, 8pm, $10.

Tony Award winner Nathan Lane stars in Douglas Carter Beane’s dark comedy about a gay burlesque performer facing a changing world. See it online during Lincoln Center’s Broadway Fridays.

THEATRE + DANCE + PODCASTS

Broadway Fridays: Online streams of select Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts featuring Broadway productions. A different performance released every Friday and remain available on demand. Initial broadcasts include Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel, Douglas Carter Beane’s The Nance, and James Lapine’s Act One. 8pm, 5 June.

Homebound Project: Founded by playwright Catya McMullen and director Jenna Worsham, theater made to support those working on the front lines of this crisis. Pick-your-own ticket prices ($10 min) grants access to online performances of new works by leading writers of American theater.

Offstage, Opening Night: Celebrate the Broadway Season that was (and will be) with Patti LuPone and the cast of “Company”; Mary-Louise Parker from “The Sound Inside”; Jeremy O. Harris, the creator of “Slave Play”; and Elizabeth Stanley of “Jagged Little Pill.” 11 June, 7pm.

Dance Africa: This year, BAM celebrates DanceAfrica with a series of digital offerings, paying special tribute to the incredible people who have shaped this festival over its rich 42-year history. Through 14 June.

Mark Morris Dance Group, Dance On!: An online event premiering four short video dances by Mark Morris, choreographed and rehearsed for the first time entirely via Zoom videoconference. The new works include: Lonely Waltz, to Maurice Ravel's La Valse; Sunshine recorded by Gene Autry; Lonely Tango; and Anger Dance set to the music of Henry Cowell. Streaming.

Jordan Casteel, Within Reach brings together 40 paintings spanning her career, including works from her celebrated series Visible Man (2013–14) and Nights in Harlem (2017), along with recent portraits at New Museum thru 1 Sept.

CANVAS

MoMA Presents Virtual Views, Arthur Jafa’s akingdoncomethas: More than 100 minutes of Black church services channeling his “belief in Black people believing.” The title references “A kingdom cometh as,” which is a millennial Christian expression for life after catastrophe, and for our community to come together in ritual and action. 4 June, 8pm; 9 June, 3pm.

MoMA Presents Virtual Views, The Starry Night: Dive into one of MoMA’s — and the world’s —most beloved and iconic paintings. Join us for a live Q&A about the painting inspired by the view from his window at the Saint-Paul-de-Mausole asylum in Saint-Rémy, where the artist spent 12 months in 1889–90 seeking reprieve from his mental illnesses, is both an exercise in observation and a clear departure from it. 11 June, 8pm.

Jordan Casteel, Within Reach: Bringing together nearly forty paintings spanning her career, including works from her celebrated series Visible Man (2013–14) and Nights in Harlem (2017), along with recent portraits of her students at Rutgers University-Newark, Within Reach will be Jordan Casteel’s first solo museum exhibition in New York City. New Museum, thru 1 Sept.

Guggenheim Works + Process Artists (WPA) Virtual Commissions: Each under five minutes, virtual performances that spotlight leading creators in the performing arts, each from the intimacy of their home. New commissions posted every Sunday and Monday, FacebookInstagram, and YouTube (@worksandprocess), 7:30pm.

In 2010, folk-singer and songwriter Zoe Boekbinder visited New Folsom Prison and began collaborating with incarcerated musicians. This was the seed for the Prison Music Project and the album, Long Time Gone, produced by Ani DiFranco and releasing 5 June.

MUSIC + COMEDY (STREAMING)

KT Tunstall: 4 June, 3pm

Ani DiFranco, Prison Music Project Sessions: 5 June, 9pm.

Diane Birch, Church of Birch: 7 June, 3pm.

SummerStage Anywhere: SummerStage will not take place in May and June, per City restrictions. In the meantime, new live performances and original content are on the website every week.

Whitney: 4 June, 8pm

Policing the Police follows Jelani Cobb, a journalist for The New Yorker, as he examines some of the inner workings of the Newark Police Department — whose practices were cited as unconstitutional in a 2014 report from the Justice Department.

CINEMA (STREAMING)

Policing the Police: Frontline documentary first aired in 2016, examining some of the inner workings of the Newark Police Department — whose practices were cited as unconstitutional in a 2014 report from the Justice Department — and follows Jelani Cobb, a journalist for The New Yorker. PBS.

Human Rights Watch Film Festival: For 31 years, the HRW Festivalhas been presenting a diverse and empowering selection of films to audiences across the world. Now online with screenings and Q&A. If the price of a ticket is prohibitive, email (filmticket@hrw.org) to receive a free ticket code.

  • Midnight Traveler: In 2015, after Hassan Fazili’s documentary Peace aired on Afghan national television, the Taliban assassinated the film’s main subject and put a price on Hassan’s head. Hassan, his wife and his daughters, fled. 4 June, 3:30pm.

  • Belly of the Beast:A brave young woman & a radical lawyer discover a pattern of involuntary sterilizations in California women’s prisons, which they take to the courtroom to wage a near impossible battle 

  • Welcome to Chechnya: Chronicles the anti-LGBTQ persecution raging in the Russian republic of Chechnya by following the LGBTQ activists who risk unimaginable peril to rescue victims. 13 June, 8pm.

  • Reunited: A story of love across borders, and the compromises a family must make when they are torn apart by circumstances beyond their control. 20 June, 3:30pm.

The High Note: Set in the LA music scene, Grace Davis is a superstar whose talent and ego have reached unbelievable heights. Maggie is Grace's overworked personal assistant who aspires to be a music producer. When Grace's manager (Ice Cube) presents her with a choice, Maggie and Grace come up with a plan. Amazon Prime.

On the Record: The story of music executive Drew Dixon as she grapples with her decision to become one of the first women of color, in the wake of #MeToo, to come forward and publicly accuse hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons of sexual assault. HBO/Max.

Circumstantial Pleasures: Lewis Klahr, known for his acclaimed collage animations, is best known for his seductive and piercing examinations of midcentury materials and music. A feature-length collection of six short films that see his focus swerve toward the contemporary. Free via Wexner Center for the Arts

I’m No Longer Here: A small street gang named “Los Terkos” spend their days listening to cumbia music and attending dance parties. Ulises, the leader, tries to protect his friends from the nefarious elements of a drug/political war, but is forced to leave for Jackson Heights, Queens — until his gang and the Kolombia culture comes under threat. Netflix

Soccer has returned to NBC Sports. The Bundesliga is playing matches without fans. But it’s something. Tune in just in time for the season’s end.

SPORT

Bundesliga: With five matches left to be play of the 2019/20 Bundesliga season and the relegation places still to be decided, the heat is well and truly on for the likes of Paderborn, Werder Bremen and Fortuna Düsseldorf.. bundesliga.com weighs up the prospects of the the seven clubs sailing closest to the relegation wind.

French Open, A Tribute: In 1980, the Fédération Française de Tennis partnered with Galerie Lelong & Co. to begin a series of annual poster designs with commissioned works by contemporary artists from around the world. Through these diverse art pieces, the creators demonstrate how the sport of tennis itself can be an art. Online, Int’l Tennis Hall of Fame.

When the Tennis Stopped: This is only the third time in history where tennis has had a stoppage of play. When the Tennis Stopped, the latest from the International Tennis Hall of Fame explores the other two times with ITHF historian-at-large Joel Drucker.

Tennis Hall of Fame Live: Hosted by Blair Henley every Thursday on the International Tennis Hall of Fame Facebook PageHall of Fame Live brings you into the conversation with tennis legends! This week, Safit Marin, and last week, Mary Pierce.

Cary Leeds Tennis: From poaching to practical skills while holing up at home, Cary Leeds tennis pros have programming until a return to the courts.

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